Eye on the Sky: Chelyabinsk Meteor

February 19, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in Astronomy, Eye on the Sky, Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment

The Chelyabinsk Meteor exploded over Russian skies Friday morning. The 55 foot chunk of rock injured over a 1,000 people with it’s shock wave alone. The following infographic gives a nice summary of the details with some interesting comparisons.

(via Space.com)

Posted By: Skuldren for Roqoo Depot.

Eye on the Sky: Andromeda

February 12, 2013 at 12:00 am | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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This image of Andromeda is via the Herschel Space Observatory (similar to the Hubble Space Telescope). Andromeda is the nearest major galaxy to our own, though still 2.5 million light years away.

Sensitive to the far-infrared light from cool dust mixed in with the gas, Herschel seeks out clouds of gas where stars are born. The new image reveals some of the very coldest dust in the galaxy — only a few tens of degrees above absolute zero — colored red in this image.

By comparison, warmer regions such as the densely populated central bulge, home to older stars, take on a blue appearance.

Intricate structure is present throughout the 200,000-light-year-wide galaxy with star-formation zones organized in spiral arms and at least five concentric rings, interspersed with dark gaps where star formation is absent.

Andromeda is host to several hundred billion stars. This new image of it clearly shows that many more stars will soon to spark into existence.

(via NASA)

Posted By: Skuldren for Roqoo Depot.

Eye on the Sky: When The Stars Stopped

February 5, 2013 at 7:29 am | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Whenever you wonder what all that money spent on NASA amounted to, just remember Hubble. It never ceases to provide a wealth of wonderful imagery, and a reminder of just how big existence is.

“The galaxy in this image, catalogued as 2MASX J09442693+0429569, marks a transitional phase in this process as young, star-forming galaxies settle to become massive, red and dead galaxies.

The galaxy has tail-like features extending from it, typical of a galaxy that has recently undergone a merger. Studying the properties of the light from this galaxy, astronomers see no sign of ongoing star formation; in other words, the merger triggered an event which has used up all the gas. However, the observations suggest that star formation was strong until the very recent past, and has ceased only within the last billion years. This image therefore shows a snapshot of the moment star formation stopped forever in a galaxy.”

(via NASA)

Posted By: Skuldren for Roqoo Depot.

Eye on the Sky: Star Births

December 18, 2012 at 11:05 am | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Nursery

The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of stars in the remnants of the gas cloud that birthed them.  3 million years ago the density of the internal knots in the gas cloud, collapsed and the stars were born.  While some of the stars were so massive they’ve already exploded in a supernova, the younger stars are so energized they create one of the largest clouds of hydrogen gas known.  This cluster is located in the galaxy M33.

Image Credit: NASA

(via NASA)

Eye on the Sky: Soyuz Re-Entry

December 11, 2012 at 10:39 am | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Soyuz Rentry

View from the International Space Station as Expedition 33 begins it’s decent into Earth’s atmosphere.  Expedition 33 Commander Suni Williams and flight engineers Yuri Malenchenko and Aki Hoshide landed on the steppes of Kazakhstan on November 19, 2012.

(via Nasa)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

Eye on the Sky: Our Own Milky Way

December 4, 2012 at 12:51 pm | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Regular Feature, Science News | Leave a comment
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Milky WayImage of the Milky Way as seen from the beach at Cape Leveque, Australia was taken by amateur astronomer and photographer, Mike Selway.  The bright orange star just to the right of center, sitting in the middle of the plane is Alpha Centauri.  The big dark spot is a cloud of dust 30 light years across called the Coal Sack.

(via Bad Astronomy)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

Eye on the Sky: Galactic Bridge

November 27, 2012 at 2:31 pm | Posted in Eye on the Sky, Science News | Leave a comment
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Located a billion light years from earth this bridge composed of hot gas links two galaxy clusters.

Image credits: Sunyaev–Zel’dovich effect: ESA Planck Collaboration; optical image: STScI Digitized Sky Survey

(via NASA)

Posted by Synlah for Roqoo Depot

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